The War Against Apathy

On days where I am myself , I am a follower of Jesus Christ and an unabashed nerd. I sing when I'm happy, sing when I'm sad, and use music to make this world a more beautiful place.
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bakerstreetbabes:

roane72:

emedealer:

meetingyourmaker:

Dangerous Housewives

Just focusing on Mary’s character as an ex(?)- assassin .I’ve been doing art on the ladies of Sherlock BBC. First one was Molly.

I love this so much.

I grin every time I see this. I think I need Mary and Nat to meet up at some point.

This is the BEST.

ayoiua:

stardusttx:

twirliest:

steampoweredplayer:

lollie-pond:

larryismyhallelujah:

thetasrose:

peachy-blisss:

myswagisnice:

I love my mom.

image

I am risking nothing

image

I AM SORRY FOLLOWERS, I LOVE MY MOMMY

Will not risk.

image

sorry followers :(

omg im so glad to se so many people love their mummy

Why’re you being mean to my mum?

 it

Nope. Googled it. 15 minuets. Nope. Not taking any chances

Koop

This has 1.2 million reblogs …
Ps not riskin it

1.4 almost
ps not risking it

better be safe still

(via asbehsam)

18,661 plays
Cabin Pressure,
Series 4 Episode 2 - Uskerty

cumbermuffin:

Martin Crieff has quite possibly the cutest reaction I’ve ever heard to a swarm of bees. If you’ve never listen to Cabin Pressure (which I highly recommend because it’s brilliant), just trust me it’ll make your day 1000% better

image

(via thebritishteapot)

jazzumon:

roseonabeach:

spoopypx:

i tried making one of those hidden message transparent ghosts but it ended up a little bit terrifying.

OH MY GOD

I SCREAMED

(via tabblr)

entropyalarm:

theshriekingsisterhood:

Things I’d like to see more of in media

characters wearing medical alert bracelets

characters taking medication with their meals

characters mentioning that they have a therapy appointment

characters with reminders to eat in their phones/calendars/planners

characters using stim toys

characters asking if an event is accessible

characters using noise cancelling headphones

characters who are disabled all the time, not just when the plot “calls for it”

characters who are disabled all the time, not just when the plot “calls for it”

image

(via clevergirlhelps)

thebritishteapot:

*looks outside*

WAIt IT WAS MORNING 3 MINUTES AGO WHAT HAPPENED TO MY DAY

*looks at watch*

12:03

THAT MAKES SENSE

corneliusdawgiusmaximus:

febricant:

SHIA LEBEOUF LIVE

THIS IS NOT A DRILL

WATCH IT ALL JUST DO IT

(via gallifreyburning)

shermansgallifreyan:

oxboxer:

feferipixies:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

everythingis19:

cosmicsyzygy:

Look, I made a gif of this most awesome wizard at the Leaky Cauldron!

DUDE IS READING ‘A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME’ BY STEPHEN HAWKING
I NEVER REALIZED

are you serious
I always assumed wizards just ignored science, because the fact that “magic” exists, can explain anything. But there are MuggleBorn wizards, ones who, until they were eleven, lived in the real world and learned science and things. Did they all just abandon that normal, muggle knowledge, like Harry did? It’s always been there, itching in the back of my mind.
FOUR FOR YOU SCIENCE WIZARD
YOU GO SCIENCE WIZARD

can we point out that he’s doing wandless magic too
like voldemort couldnt even do that ****
molly ****** weasley couldnt ****** do that
who are you

Quick, somebody write a book series about the adventures of Magic Prodigy Science Wizard!!!
PLEASE SOMEONE JUST DO IT

Alan Baker had no use for wands, of course. If one were to Prior Incantato his outdated, duct-taped rod of walnut wood and dragon heartstring, its most recent use would have been the enchantment of the long-lived neurons in Alan’s own mind. This enchantment, possible only for those who were capable of seeing themselves as a complex amalgamation of neural impulses, allowed him to bypass both wands and words. Alan did this, not for show, not for power, but because wandwork distracted him from his reading.
Unfortunately, there was no legal spell to get rid of barflies.
“Hey- hey mate, you gotta- gotta minute to-“
Sobrius, Alan thought, placing one hand on his neighbor’s forehead without looking up. He pondered whether or not to cast a silencing barrier, even in violation of the Leaky Cauldron’s safety code.
“Thanks,” said the now-sober man, “Readin’ more of that Muggle trash, I see.”
Alan closed his eyes and counted to three, but when he opened them, the man was still there. Alan lowered his “muggle trash” in defeat, meeting the baggy, bloodshot eyes of the wizard sitting across from him.
Alan leaned forward, placing his hands steeple-like on the table. “Mr. Fletcher, do you know why time turners don’t send you into space?”
“The sky, y’mean? Cause they’re fer time turnin’, not apparation.”
Alan had to take a deep breath. “No,” he replied, “If time turners weren’t anchored to anything, the Earth’s rotation alone would be enough to ensure a time traveler’s demise. But someone at the ministry was clever enough to anchor them to a carefully guarded object that never moves relative to the Earth.”
“Fascinat’n,” slurred Mundungus, whose eyes had glazed over once it became clear that Alan didn’t actually have a time turner on him.
“But time turners are still very limited,” continued Alan, more to himself than to Mundungus, “They can’t go more than seven hours back, and not forward at all, and only in increments of one hour, and they only work on Earth… no, they’re very clumsy, if one truly pauses to think about it.”
“What’s yer point?”
“My point is that while wizards are slowly stagnating in their backwards remnant of the Dark Ages, Muggles are making progress, ever reaching for the light. Do you know that they don’t need magic to craft a hand of living silver?”
“Bah,” was Mundungus’s only reply, “You’d be best mates with that Weasley nutcase at the ministry, you would.”
Alan stood up, silently casting an infantes gelata to check for paradoxes. “I don’t know why I bother with you,” he sighed, “you’ve just wasted another two minutes of my time. Perhaps I bother because I have time to waste.”
And he twisted, as if to apparate, but instead faded out of existence with a distinct vworp. The air swirled in the wake of his departure, blowing back Mundungus’s straggly ginger hair.
“Muggleborns,” the short wizard muttered, then turned back to his drink.
••••••••
Thirty minutes earlier, Alan lounged contentedly within his quieting barrier, stirring his cup of tea absently and rereading one of his favourite Muggle books. He wondered, vaguely, which planet held the nearest sapient life, and what their magic would look like…

shermansgallifreyan:

oxboxer:

feferipixies:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

everythingis19:

cosmicsyzygy:

Look, I made a gif of this most awesome wizard at the Leaky Cauldron!

DUDE IS READING ‘A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME’ BY STEPHEN HAWKING

I NEVER REALIZED

are you serious

I always assumed wizards just ignored science, because the fact that “magic” exists, can explain anything. But there are MuggleBorn wizards, ones who, until they were eleven, lived in the real world and learned science and things. Did they all just abandon that normal, muggle knowledge, like Harry did? It’s always been there, itching in the back of my mind.

FOUR FOR YOU SCIENCE WIZARD

YOU GO SCIENCE WIZARD

can we point out that he’s doing wandless magic too

like voldemort couldnt even do that ****

molly ****** weasley couldnt ****** do that

who are you

Quick, somebody write a book series about the adventures of Magic Prodigy Science Wizard!!!

PLEASE SOMEONE JUST DO IT

Alan Baker had no use for wands, of course. If one were to Prior Incantato his outdated, duct-taped rod of walnut wood and dragon heartstring, its most recent use would have been the enchantment of the long-lived neurons in Alan’s own mind. This enchantment, possible only for those who were capable of seeing themselves as a complex amalgamation of neural impulses, allowed him to bypass both wands and words. Alan did this, not for show, not for power, but because wandwork distracted him from his reading.

Unfortunately, there was no legal spell to get rid of barflies.

“Hey- hey mate, you gotta- gotta minute to-“

Sobrius, Alan thought, placing one hand on his neighbor’s forehead without looking up. He pondered whether or not to cast a silencing barrier, even in violation of the Leaky Cauldron’s safety code.

“Thanks,” said the now-sober man, “Readin’ more of that Muggle trash, I see.”

Alan closed his eyes and counted to three, but when he opened them, the man was still there. Alan lowered his “muggle trash” in defeat, meeting the baggy, bloodshot eyes of the wizard sitting across from him.

Alan leaned forward, placing his hands steeple-like on the table. “Mr. Fletcher, do you know why time turners don’t send you into space?”

“The sky, y’mean? Cause they’re fer time turnin’, not apparation.”

Alan had to take a deep breath. “No,” he replied, “If time turners weren’t anchored to anything, the Earth’s rotation alone would be enough to ensure a time traveler’s demise. But someone at the ministry was clever enough to anchor them to a carefully guarded object that never moves relative to the Earth.”

“Fascinat’n,” slurred Mundungus, whose eyes had glazed over once it became clear that Alan didn’t actually have a time turner on him.

“But time turners are still very limited,” continued Alan, more to himself than to Mundungus, “They can’t go more than seven hours back, and not forward at all, and only in increments of one hour, and they only work on Earth… no, they’re very clumsy, if one truly pauses to think about it.”

“What’s yer point?”

“My point is that while wizards are slowly stagnating in their backwards remnant of the Dark Ages, Muggles are making progress, ever reaching for the light. Do you know that they don’t need magic to craft a hand of living silver?”

“Bah,” was Mundungus’s only reply, “You’d be best mates with that Weasley nutcase at the ministry, you would.”

Alan stood up, silently casting an infantes gelata to check for paradoxes. “I don’t know why I bother with you,” he sighed, “you’ve just wasted another two minutes of my time. Perhaps I bother because I have time to waste.”

And he twisted, as if to apparate, but instead faded out of existence with a distinct vworp. The air swirled in the wake of his departure, blowing back Mundungus’s straggly ginger hair.

“Muggleborns,” the short wizard muttered, then turned back to his drink.

••••••••

Thirty minutes earlier, Alan lounged contentedly within his quieting barrier, stirring his cup of tea absently and rereading one of his favourite Muggle books. He wondered, vaguely, which planet held the nearest sapient life, and what their magic would look like…

(via jace-and-will-heronduck)

blondesforreagan:

confessionsofacollegerepublican:

babebraham-lincolon:

confessionsofacollegerepublican:

How’s that universal healthcare working out for you, eh? 

That’s because here not as many people go in because they know they can’t afford it.

I’d like to know where you picked up that little tidbit…. 

I looked up the average emergency room wait times in both the US and Canada, in hopes of eliminating the concern of financial burden on patients, as most US emergency rooms are obligated to treat patients, regardless of their ability to pay. Now, not only did I discover that Canadian hospitals have the longest emergency room wait times in the developed world, but Canadian patients will on average wait four times longer for emergency treatment than Americans

The importance here is not the wait for specialty care or even the worry:  it’s the outcome.  Longer waits increase mortality and morbidity. As much as insurance allows, primary care sends patients to specialists. Primary docs also order all the tests they can ahead of time.  There’s maybe a 2-7 day wait for most tests; if your doc thinks it’s better you get the CAT scan today, you go the ER.  If they think you should see a specialist today and you can’t see one, you go to the ER and the attending in that specialty will see you… eventually.  It’s not the best use of the system but you are less likely to die or get sicker.  But ideally, the specialist gets the primary’s notes and tests results ahead of an appointment. You get on the schedule quickly, sooner if things are very concerning this way: a) you don’t die waiting for a needed coronary by-pass, b) you don’t let your suspicious pap become Stage IIb Cervical cancer waiting to see the gyn oncologist, c) your renal insufficiency and high blood pressure doesn’t become end-stage renal failure and oops you are on dialysis forever.  In Canada (and Australia), you also wait weeks/months for the freaking test along with the appointments so once you see the specialist, definitive treatment can be months to years.

No one is ever, EVER turned away from an ER.  In fact, if you show up to an ER that does not have the type or level of care which you need - such as burn care, trauma-level, dental, psych, eye - you will be transported by ambulance or even medivac helicopter when necessary.  All will done to ‘err on the side of life’ whether you are someone who appears to be a homeless uninsured 70 year old drug addict or the Queen of bloody England.  Same treatment (ok sure, we have a couple inpatient ‘VIP rooms’ in most hospitals for, you guessed it VIPs but also for employees or higher profile people in the community especially if they are in for sensitive reasons). 

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

(via illoustrioustaco)

fairy-wren:

albino ruby-throated hummingbird

(photo via discovery)

(via ghostflowerdreams)

mugglebornheadcanons:

Muggle-born students being taught about the spell obliviate and immediately declaring their wands ‘neuralyzers’ and spending the rest of the day erasing people’s memories and quoting Men In Black, much to the confusion of the purebloods. But there’s this one muggle-born professor who thinks it’s hilarious and proclaims himself Agent K and magics up black sunglasses for all the people who get it and they spend the day annoying the hell out of everyone. 

(via thestral13)

alt-j:

why is James spelled with an s. why is it plural. more than 1 Jame. how many James.

(via shivermepickles)